What is Amaro?


Not sure what amaro is, or what it has to do with our non-alcoholic drinks? You’ve come to the right place.


Amaro is an Italian bitters drink made for resting, reconnecting, and generally having a nice time.

Although amaro usually contains alcohol, our drinks don’t. And while our amaro leisure sodas borrow flavors ideas from those traditional Italian drinks, amaro and the culture around it inspire a lot more of what we do here, because of how it’s enjoyed and what it’s made from.

The ritual…

We all use little rituals to make leisure time feel special, and having a drink is one of our favorites. In traditional Italian leisure culture, that drink is especially important around mealtimes and amaro is one of the most common before or after dinner drink.

That’s why our drinks are crafted – from the flavors, to the bubbles, to the designs on the labels – as a reminder to slow down, whether you’re sitting down for a nice meal, taking a short break from work, or spending time with the people you love.

The ingredients…

Like our leisure sodas, amaro is made through botanical extraction. There’s a reason every pocket of human civilization over the last few thousand years has relied on botanical extracts to make the kinds of drinks that bring people together, from spiritual gatherings in Neolithic-era China to the Existentialists sipping vermouth in Paris.

Our drinks simply provide the benefits of real botanical extraction without the alcohol.

The reality…

The reason we love amaro enough to make it the center of what we do is because it’s fun. The flavors can be challenging, complex, and easy all at once. Sharing a drink like that with someone you care about is a delightful feeling.

We wanted to bring that special feeling of sharing something new to you, so that you can feel the same way when you share it with someone else.

If you want to learn more about amaro, check out Brad Thomas Parsons' fantastic book, Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs. It was one of my first entry points into this world, and I still refer to it often.